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Cornwall Zoological Society; Creating a better future
Topic Started: Jan 30 2018, 02:44 PM (322 Views)
Dylan
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Cornwall Zoological Society is a conservation organization with a mission to save species from extinction.
Cornwall Zoolgical Society is a charitable institution, founded in 2018. Formerly the trust was named North of England Zoological Society.

Its headquarters are in Luxulyan Valley, in the region of Cornwall on the South coast of England. The grounds of Luxulyan Manor form the St. Ives Wildlife Park, which was established as a sanctuary and breeding centre for endangered species. The zoological park was known as Cornwall Wetland Centre.




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St. Ives Wildlife Park (formerly Cornwall Wetland Centre) is a zoological park established in 2017 on the South coast of England. It is operated by the Cornwall Zoological Society. It has approximately 120,000 visitors per year; visitor numbers tend to vary with the tourist trade. Currently 63 species are held in the society, many globally threatened or rare in captivity, such as the Javan rhino.




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Roxas Wildlife Centre, formerly the Roxas Bird Breeding Centre, is an 8-acre (3 ha) non-profit zoological park in Roxas, Mindoro. The land lies east of the city of Roxas. Built in 2018, and owned by the Cornwall Zoological Society, it receives just 6000 visitors a year, which makes it one of Roxas' most popular paid-for tourist attraction. As well as catering to tourists and locals, the centre is involved in many scientific pursuits, such as captive breeding of endangered animals, researching into animal behaviour, and active participation in various conservation programs in Indonesia and the Philippines.




Aside from the two parks, the society heavily donates to several conservation programmes such as the Bali myna breeding program which it is part of. One in-situ programme is the conservation of the Mindoro bleeding-heart. Recently a small patch of forest with a large marble mine, banana forest and a road cutting through it. The Society is working with locals to increase their standard of living whilst ensuring the endangered animals and plants in the forest aren't put at risk.
Edited by Dylan, Mar 12 2018, 03:09 PM.
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Dylan
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Some of the new Arrivals include Geoldi's marmoset and a pair of female Przewalski's wild horse to accompany our lone male. But by far the most exciting arrival is the arrival of three (one male and two females) critically endangered Black-faced lion tamarin. These are the first recorded individuals not only in the RTZI, but the first in captivity outside their range in the world. Currently they are living in an off-show exhibit and are unlikely to ever go on-show.

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But, of course, there is a list of species that have left the collection. The most notable ones is our three male Red-flanked duikers, which left to the Rockchester Zoo in the US.




On the breeding front, only a few species have bred. But most importantly is the breeding of two baby Pere David deer. We gained three females of this species from Northwick zoo in North Carolina, US. Our male arrived from Rockchester Zoo Park shortly after. They were recently released into their permanent quarters and swiftly showed us their appreciation but two of the females giving birth. We are pleased to report that both fawns are happy, healthy and running around in their brand-new enclosure.

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Edited by Dylan, Mar 13 2018, 04:03 PM.
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Dylan
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A short unofficial notice to inform other following that the vets have just confirmed that one of our female Black-faced lion tamarin (Stud #2) is pregnant! This is the first captive pregnancy recorded in this species,
offering a glimmer of hope to this rare and declining species. In other news another of our black lion tamarin females has also be confirmed as pregnant.
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Dylan
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Update two


New species that have arrived in the zoo. These include a pair of critically endangered Malabar civet and a male Siamang which came from Rockchester.

But, as with last time, we have lost a number of animals. This time our 3.0 Blue-crowned laughingthrush from Roxas have left the collection when they went to Rockchester.


Breeding has gone extremely well with a number of rare and endangered species. First is our male giant anteater was getting really busy, impregnating all three females with two offspring already born. The male and female are unlikely to remain in the zoo.

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From the same section, our Coscoroba swans also bred. All five will leave the collection after they have grown up and the parents will move to the Duckery and be replaced with Black-necked swan.

The Pere David deer have also been busy with a new fawn. This is the third birth this year so we are proud to have bred this species.

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We have bred not one but two species of tamarins. Both of these are massively exciting because both species are super rare in both the wild an di captivity. The Black lion tamarins have been bred before but we have bred a total of five. Many of them will remain here to set up new pairs and fill in gaps in our breeding group. Then any left-overs would move out to other collections. Most exciting of all the new arrivals are the two Black-headed lion tamarin as the first ever birth in captivity of this species.

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Edited by Zoo Tycooner FR, Today, 4:14 AM.
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Dylan
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A New Logo!


We are excited to show you a brand new logo for the Mindoro-based Roxas Bird Breeding centre courtesy of the artist Brendan Burns. It features four species that we specialise in. Top left features the Mindoro bleeding-heart (Gallicolumba platenae), a critically species that receives little conservation funds or attention but we hold of a pair on display and work in-situ on a reserve we own to protect the little habitat they have left. Beneath them is the javan green magpie (Cissa thalassina) which is another critically endangered species that we keep. On-show we only have two pairs but we also have four pairs off-show in a custom-built facility to breed these beautiful birds. Next to the JGM is a Bali starling (Leucopsar rothschildi). This is another critical species that is one of the main goals of the centre. The bird only has about 1,000 individuals left on the planet so our ten birds are paramount to saving the species. The last species is an unusual species called the elegant sunbird (Aethopyga duyvenbodei). Of the four species represented, this is the species we work least with, however our pair is the only breeding birds in the RTZI and we hold an international studbook for the species. But our work continues beyond these four species. Roxas alone holds fifteen threatened species, most of the collection and we work with communities from Cambodia to Papua New Guinea to improve their livelihoods whilst protecting the forest and habitats that surround them.

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