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Extinct Animal Questions
Topic Started: Nov 26 2013, 10:24 PM (194,070 Views)
Fluffs
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Pull my finger!

Well Gaia has a similar topic, so why not the TRT?

Basically you post a question related to anything having to do with paleontology.

If I'm correct, do we only know the color schemes of Sinosauropteryx, Anchiornis, Microraptor, and Archaeopteryx?
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CyborgIguana
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We also know the colour schemes of Sinornithosaurus and Caudipteryx, if I'm correct. ;)
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caviar
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how was caudipteryx coloured?
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CyborgIguana
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Red with blue patches on its back and wings, and dark brown to black bands on its tail feathers if I remember correctly.
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Fluffs
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Pull my finger!

Is there a source? I can't seem to find it. :/
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Similis
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Quote:
 
Caudipteryx (Pennaceous wing feathers on second finger and as a fan on tip of the tail. Secondary flight feathers preserved in C. dongi but not C. zoui. Shorter, possibly simpler feathers cover the body. Fingers are scaly/naked. Stripes are present on the tail feathers. [Published: Ji et al., 1998 "Two feathered dinosaurs from northeastern China" and Zhou & Wang, 2000 "A new species of Caudipteryx from the Yixian Formation of Liaoning, northeast China"])


Borrowed from Hell Creek forum. From what I've gathered, we know the pattern, not the colour. Google and GS weren't helpful on the matter.
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Robbie
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●■♥WHY?♥■●

A question, who found the first dinosaur? and what was the first dinosaur to be discovered?
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CyborgIguana
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Iguanodon, discovered in the 1820s by geologist William Buckland. ;)
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Jules
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Mihi est imperare orbi universo

It depends ;) Megalosaurus is generally considered the first dinosaur to be named. It was first described by Robert Plot in 1676, who considered it a Roman war elephant and later a giant human. It was then named Scrotum humanum, which means Human Testicles, in 1763, by Richard Brookes. but it was named Megalosaurus by Buckland in 1824.

EDIT : CI, Iguanodon was actually discovered by Owen, later.
Edited by Jules, Nov 29 2013, 01:14 PM.
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Admiral General Aladeen
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Well dinosaur bones have been found for thousands of years by people who didnt know what they were. For example, in Ancient China they were thought to be the bones of a dragon.
Way later in 1676, a large femur was found in England by Reverend Plot. It was most likely that of a dinosaur even though it was said to be from a giant. So that was I guess the first really recorded find.
The first dinosaur to be scientifically described was Megalosaurus by William Buckland, in 1824.

EDIT: CJ and Cyborg beat me to it.
Edited by Admiral General Aladeen, Nov 29 2013, 01:14 PM.
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CyborgIguana
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Crookedjaw
Nov 29 2013, 01:12 PM
It depends ;) Megalosaurus is generally considered the first dinosaur to be named. It was first described by Robert Plot in 1676, who considered it a Roman war elephant and later a giant human. It was then named Scrotum humanum, which means Human Testicles, in 1763, by Richard Brookes. but it was named Megalosaurus by Buckland in 1824.

EDIT : CI, Iguanodon was actually discovered by Owen, later.
Actually, it was NAMED by Owen, but discovered by Buckland much earlier. ;)
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Jules
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Mihi est imperare orbi universo

Actually, we were both wrong xD It was Mantell xD
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Fluffs
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Pull my finger!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/25/unique-wedding-ring_n_4338966.html

Does anyone know what dinosaur species is used, and also is this harmful to the paleontology field?
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CyborgIguana
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The Jurassic period wasn't 65 million years ago you morons! Even the Cretaceous ended a million years before that! Seriously, would it KILL these journalists to do even a LICK of research???? But yeah, I'd say it's pretty dumb that dinosaur fossils from the Morrison formation that should be studied by science are instead being ground up into cheap wedding rings. What's especially discomforting is that no one seems to care about this stuff. People never see the theft or vandalism of fossils as a big deal, and even see punishing the idiots who commit such acts as a step too far, and that they should just be allowed to get away with it. Fossils are natural treasures that deserve to be treated with respect, and that fact needs to snap into the heads of the human race.
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Similis
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Depends what was the fossil of. If it was one of the species that is extremely abundant in the rocks, the harm is little, but still done. Also, 65 milion years ago was Paleocene, dinosaurs that weren't birds went extinct at that point. If we go by "eras" then it was Cenozoic, Jurassic is a period. Mesozoic is an era. But 65 mya wasn't Mesozoic anymore, according to the so far accepted dating.


*sigh* The shit I put up with.
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